Nonimmigrant Visa: Transit Visa

The U.S. Consulate General, Hamilton, Bermuda can only accept visa appointment requests from Bermudians,  Bermuda residents or individuals physically present in our consular district.  The provisions of 22 CFR 41.101(a) preclude acceptance or processing of a regular non immigrant visa application when the applicant is neither resident of nor physically present in this consular district at the time of application, including completion and submission of the DS-160.      

Please note, we are not accepting out of district visa appointments at this time. 

Important: if applicable please see Visa Exemptions for Bermudians.

 

Generally, a citizen of a foreign country who wishes to enter the United States must first obtain a visa, either a nonimmigrant visa for temporary stay, or an immigrant visa for permanent residence.  Transit (C) visas are nonimmigrant visas for persons traveling in immediate and continuous transit through the United States en route to another country, with few exceptions.  Immediate and continuous transit is defined as a reasonably expeditious departure of the traveler in the normal course of travel as the elements permit and assumes a prearranged itinerary without any unreasonable layover privileges.  If the traveler seeks layover privileges for purposes other than for transit through the United States, such as to visit friends or engage in sightseeing, the traveler will have to qualify for the type of visa required for that purpose.

If you already have a valid visitor (B) visa, you may be able to use it to transit the United States. If you are a citizen of a participating country, you may be able to transit the United States on the Visa Waiver Program.

Please see the Department of State’s Transit Visa website for additional information.

EXPEDITE REQUESTS 

The following are some circumstances that may be considered for expedited transit visa appointments:

  • an immediate relative’s death, grave illness, or life threatening accident that requires travel via the United States.  Please include the name, relationship place and description of the situation, and contact information for the attending physician or funeral home;
  • urgent medical treatment for the applicant or their minor child that requires travel via the United States;

If you want to request an expedited appointment, in your email to us at hamiltonconsulate@state.gov (as noted above) outline your emergency or urgent situation and reason you require an expedited appointment.  If your situation is deemed an emergency, or urgent, we will schedule the appointment as soon as we are able.

 

  • A foreign citizen traveling to another country who will have a brief layover in the United States when the only reason for entering the United States is to transit.
  • A passenger embarking from a foreign port on a cruise ship or other vessel which is proceeding to another country, other than the United States, but during the course of the journey, the vessel makes port in the United States with no intention of landing in the United States.
  • A crewmember traveling to the United States as a passenger to join a ship or aircraft you will work on, providing services for operation. You will also need a crewmember D visa, most often issued as a combination C-1/D visa. Learn more about Crewmember visas.
  • A foreign citizen proceeding in immediate and continuous transit through the United States to or from the United Nations Headquarters District, under provisions of the Headquarters agreement with the United Nations, requires a diplomatic transit (C-2) visa. Travel within the United States will be limited to the immediate New York City vicinity.
  • A foreign citizen whose layover in the United States is for a primary purpose other than to transit, for example to visit friends or sightsee, requires a visitor (B) visa.
  • A coasting officer seeking to enter the United States generally requires a visitor (B) visa. Coasting officers are employed temporarily when an officer of a foreign ship is granted home leave while the vessel is in U.S. ports, provided the vessel does not remain in U.S. waters for more than 29 days. The coasting officer may then repeat the process with another vessel of the same foreign line.
  • A crewmember on a private yacht sailing out of a foreign port which will be cruising in U.S. waters for more than 29 days is generally required to have a visitor (B) visa.
  • An officer or employee of a designated international organization assigned to the United States may pass in immediate and continuous transit through the United States on an International Organization (G-4) visa.